Exam Stress Solutions

test picIt’s happening in households across the country – children sitting their GCSEs or A Levels are suffering from exam stress. As parents, we suffer too – trying to encourage our children to revise long enough and well enough, testing them on subjects that we have long-forgotten. Somehow these now seem to be ramped up with a bewildering array of new facts and new ways of learning and presenting a topic that we may only dimly remember from our own schooldays. We also have to make sure that our children get enough rest, nourishment, relaxation and encouragement. I was speaking to Tracey Campbell, a homeopath, recently and she explained that many of her exam-age clients are presenting with sleep-related problems. You know yourself that when you are worried about something, sleep can be elusive. This can mean that you can’t get to sleep at all, that you wake up with a start in the middle of the night or that sleep is restless and shallow and you wake up exhausted. Did you know that a homeopath can offer relief from some if not all of these symptoms? Read Tracey’s article here to find out more.

The Single Mum's Survival Guide - Easter Blog

 

Not an Easy-Breezy Time

single mum's survival guide logoRecently my 16 year old and I had one of those conversations where you tackle Life, The Universe and Everything. During the course of our conversation he shared with me something very touching. A friend had asked him about his childhood and all the upheaval we’ve had in our lives, which (if you don’t know my back story) included his dad leaving us when he was 3 weeks and his brother 3 years old, a scary period when I was stuck in a disastrous second marriage to a Jekyll and Hyde character and the painful and confusing jordan-whitt-145327end of my 9 year partnership at the end of August.

His friend was moved to tears, which he reported had surprised him. “I mean, I know we didn’t have an easy-breezy time, Mum – especially you”, he explained, “but I’ve always thought of myself as having a very happy childhood”. And do you know: I agree. Some of our past has been incredibly sad and difficult but as a family the boys and I have kept close, kept talking and had some fun along the way. Whatever else was going on my sons had all the normal ingredients that a happy childhood needs – things like bedtime stories, fun and games, children’s parties and play-dates, fresh air, exercise, arts and crafts, days out and excursions, family time, essential rules and values, plenty of conversation and lots and lots of love.

Many of the single mums I’ve worked with have been consumed with guilt that the upheaval in their own relationships will have permanently damaged their children. Not necessarily so, I promise you. There is a well-known theory that the crucial formative years are 0-7 and that beyond that it’s too late too change what’s already been laid down. I have also heard that up until the age of 15, a child or young adult is still open to beneficial influence when it comes to the forming of their character, beliefs and values. The truth is that even as adults we are growing, learning and putting down new neural pathways all the time. It’s never too late to give your child a happy and stable childhood and even grown children can learn new ways to be at peace with the traumatic events or feelings of a less-than-perfect-past. If the love, communication and intent is there then as far as I’m concerned you are more than halfway there, no matter what life may throw at you and your child.

To get clear on your family values and how to create a happy home for your child, whatever else is happening, why not take advantage of my free strategy session?